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How Native American tribes saved a giant, ancient squash from oblivion

How Native American tribes saved a giant, ancient squash from oblivion

How Native American tribes saved a giant, ancient squash from oblivion. 

The seeds passed through a couple of pairs of hands before they got to the farm. But they started with Paul DeMain, a member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin (board member of Honor the Earth) and the editor of News from Indian Country. DeMain says his seeds originally came from the Miami tribe in Indiana and are thought to be from a line that's somewhere between 1,000 to 2,000 years old.

Slow Food Turtle Island

Slow Food Turtle Island

Slow Food Turtle Island

On February 22, representatives from Indigenous food projects around the country gathered at theTaos County Economic Development Corporation (TCEDC) with representatives from Slow Food USA(and Skyped in Slow Foods International) as well as the Christiansen Fund, to discuss the possibility and mechanics of establishing a Slow Foods chapter specifically for Indigenous people from Canada, the US, and Mexico. Participants felt that having a Slow Food association separate from the national organizations would give Native communities better opportunities to network, develop presidia to protect Indigenous foods, and send Native delegates to Terra Madre in Italy.